torstai 27. joulukuuta 2012

Pontiac 1970 LeMans - GTO - Bonneville

Pontiac Grand Prix 1970

 The Pontiac Grand Prix is an automobile that was produced by the Pontiac division of General Motors. First introduced as part of Pontiac's full-size model offering for the 1962 model year, the Grand Prix name was also applied to cars in the personal luxury car market segment and the mid-size offering, slotting below the large Bonneville in the company's lineup.

Vertical grille inserts replaced the horizontal bars of the 1969, movement of "Grand Prix" nameplates from the lower cowls to the rear C-pillars and the vertical chromed louvers from the C-pillars down to the lower cowls, highlighted the 1970 Grand Prix. The optional 428 CID V8 rated at 370 and 390 hp (290 kW) in 1969 was replaced by a new 370 hp (280 kW) 455 CID V8 with 500 lb·ft (680 N·m) of torque at 3,100 rpm. The base 350 hp 400 CID engine was still standard, but a low-compression 400 CID engine was available with a two-barrel carburetor. An automatic transmission was offered as a no cost option.

Interior trim also received minor revisions, and a bench seat with center armrest returned as a no-cost option to the standard Strato bucket seats and console. Bench seat-equipped Grand Prixs got a steering column-mounted shifter with the automatic transmission along with a dashboard-mounted glovebox, replacing the console-mounted shifter and glovebox of bucket-seat cars. Power front disc brakes became standard equipment this year.




Pontiac Grand Prix 1970

  Due to the success of the 1969 Grand Prix, other GM divisions followed suit and introduced similar cars for 1970. The Chevrolet Monte Carlo used the same basic G-body as the GP but with a two-inch shorter wheelbase (116 vs. the GP's 118) and a long hood, though still a bit shorter than the Grand Prix's, but still considered an upscale vehicle for GM's lowest-priced division. Oldsmobile, whose larger and more expensive front-drive Toronado was a direct competitor to the Thunderbird, decided to further capitalize on strong sales of its intermediate Cutlass line by introducing a new Cutlass Supreme coupe with a formal roofline similar to the GPs but on the standard 112 in (2,800 mm) wheelbase used for two-door A-body intermediates and the same lower sheetmetal used on other Cutlass models. Both the Monte Carlo and Cutlass Supreme were also much lower in price, primarily due to smaller standard engines of 350 cubic inches for both, and the fact that many items standard on the GP were optional on those models — however, all three cars with similar equipment were actually much closer in price than the base sticker prices suggest. The introduction of the Monte Carlo and Cutlass Supreme did, however, cut into the Grand Prix's dominance, and sales dropped 40%. 65,750 Grand Prixs were built in 1970.

Variations of the 1969 GP's central V-nose grille appeared on other 1970 Pontiacs including the full-sized cars and intermediate Tempest/Le Mans series. Ford even got in the act by putting a somewhat similar nose on the 1970 Thunderbird, whose sales actually increased significantly over the 1969 model. Interestingly, the 1970 T-Bird styling change was reportedly ordered by Ford Motor Co. president Bunkie Knudsen, who moved from GM to Ford in 1968 after a long career at GM which included the position of general manager for the Pontiac Motor Division from 1956-1961 and ordered the addition of the Grand Prix to the 1962 model lineup.


Pontiac Bonneville 1970

  The Pontiac Bonneville was a full-size automobile built by the Pontiac division of General Motors from 1957 to 2005. It was introduced as a limited production performance convertible during the 1957 model year. The Bonneville (known as the Parisienne in Canada until 1981), and its platform partner, the Grand Ville, are some of the largest Pontiacs ever built; in station wagon body styles they reached just over 19 feet (5.8 m) long, and were also some of the heaviest cars produced at the time (2.5 short tons, 5,000 lb or 2,300 kg).


Pontiac Bonneville 1970
 A General Motors corporate edict that took effect with the 1967 model year led Pontiac to discontinue the Tri Power engine options on all of its cars. That year also brought a larger 400 cu in (6.6 L) V8 as the standard engine for Bonneville and other full-sized Pontiacs to replace the previous 389, while the 421 cu in (6.9 L) V8 was replaced by a new 428 cu in (7.0 L) engine that offered as much as 390 horsepower (290 kW). Also beginning in 1967, carburetion was changed. The previous standard 600 cfm Carter square bore four barrel and optional Tri-Power was replaced with the new Quadarajet spread bore carburetor delivering 800 cfm, equivalent to the previous 1966 Tri Power set-up. For 1969, a 360 hp (270 kW) 428 became the standard Bonneville engine, which in turn was replaced for 1970 by an even larger 455 cu in (7.5 L) V8 rated at 370 hp (280 kW).
Pontiac Excutive 1970

  The Pontiac Executive was an automobile model produced by the Pontiac Motor Division of General Motors from 1967 to 1970.The Executive name replaced Pontiac's long running mid-range Star Chief, beginning for 1966 when all Pontiacs in this range were named Star Chief Executive for this one year only, before the series became simply the Executive for 1967.

Executives featured more deluxe trim, more standard amenities and a longer wheelbase and overall length than the lower-priced Catalina models, but were not quite as luxurious as the top-line Bonneville, whose wheelbase and other dimensions the Executive shared.


Pontiac Excutive 1970

  Mechanically, the Executive was virtually identical to the Catalina, sharing similar standard and optional V8 engines starting with the base 400 CID V8 with two-barrel carburetor rated at 265 hp (198 kW), and ending with a 390 hp 428 CID HO V8 through 1969 and a larger 455 CID V8 rated at 370 hp (276 kW) in 1970. The standard transmission each year was a three-speed manual with column shift, with a floor-mounted four-speed with Hurst shifter optional in 1967 and 1968. However, 98 percent of Executives were equipped with the three-speed Turbo Hydra-Matic automatic during the model's four year run.

Executives were available as a four-door pillared sedan, two-door hardtop coupe, four-door hardtop sedan, and Safari station wagons in two and three-seat versions. The Executive Safari wagons differed from the Catalina and Bonneville Safari wagons by featuring simulated wood paneling. No Executive convertibles were offered.


Pontiac Catalina 1970

 The Pontiac Catalina is an automobile which was part of Pontiac's full-sized line from 1950 to 1981. Initially, the name was used strictly to denote hardtop body styles, first appearing in the 1950 Chieftain Eight and DeLuxe Eight lines. In 1959, the Catalina became a separate model, as the 'entry-level' full-size Pontiac



Pontiac Catalina 1970

 Variable-ratio power steering was a new option this year and front disc brakes were now automatically included when the power brake option was ordered.

Engine offerings consisted of a standard 290-horsepower 400 two-barrel (or no-cost optional regular-fuel 265-horsepower 400 with Turbo Hydramatic transmission), 330-horsepower 400 four-barrel, 370-horsepower 428 four-barrel or the 428 HO rated at 390 horses. The standard three-speed manual transmission and optional three-speed Turbo Hydramatic were continued as before, but the four-speed manual with Hurst shifter was dropped from the option list.

All full-sized Pontiacs, including Catalinas, received a new Grand Prix-like V-nose grille for 1970 along with 'horns ports' on a facelifted front end and new taillights mounted in the rear bumper. Catalina sedans and coupes now came standard with a smaller 255-horsepower 350 cubic-inch Pontiac V8 as standard equipment with optional engines including the previously standard 400 two-barrel rated at 265 and 290 horsepower (still standard on convertibles and Safari wagons), a 330-horsepower 400 four-barrel and a two versions of the new 455 cubic-inch V8 rated at 360 horsepower (270 kW) or 370 horses with the "HO" option. As in past years, a three-speed manual transmission with column shift was standard equipment, but most cars were equipped with the optional three-speed Turbo Hydramatic. Also offered for 1970, but seldom ordered, was a two-speed automatic transmission, Turbo Hydramatic 300 that was available with the 350 V8.


Pontiac GTO 1970

 The Pontiac GTO is an American automobile built by Pontiac Division of General Motors from 1964 to 1974 and by GM subsidiary Holden in Australia from 2004 to 2006. It was a muscle car classic of the 1960s and 1970s. From 1964 until midway through 1973 it was closely related to the Pontiac Tempest/Le Mans and for the 1974 model year it was based on the Pontiac Ventura. The 21st century GTO is essentially a left-hand drive Holden Monaro, itself a coupe variant of the Holden Commodore.

The GTO was the brainchild of Pontiac engineer Russell Gee, an engine specialist; Bill Collins, a chassis engineer; and Pontiac chief engineer John DeLorean. In early 1963, General Motors' management issued an edict banning divisions from involvement in auto racing. At the time, Pontiac's advertising and marketing approach was heavily based on performance, and racing was an important component of that strategy. With GM's ban on factory-sponsored racing, Pontiac's young, visionary management turned its attention to emphasizing street performance.

In his autobiography “Glory Days,” Pontiac chief marketing manager Jim Wangers, who worked for the division’s contract advertising and public relations agency, states that John DeLorean, Bill Collins and Russ Gee were indeed responsible for the GTO's creation. It involved transforming the upcoming redesigned Tempest (which was set to revert to a conventional front-engine, front transmission, rear-wheel drive configuration) into a "Super Tempest" with the larger 389 cu in (6.4 L) Pontiac V8 engine from the full-sized Pontiac Catalina and Bonneville in place of the standard 326 cu in (5.3 L) Tempest V8. By promoting the big-engine Tempest as a special high-performance model, they could appeal to the speed-minded youth market (which had also been recognized by Ford Motor Company's Lee Iacocca, who was at that time preparing the Ford Mustang).



Pontiac GTO 1970

  The GTO was basically a violation of GM policy limiting the A-body intermediate line to a maximum engine displacement of 330 cu in (5.4 L). Since the GTO was an option package and not standard equipment, it could be considered to fall into a loophole in the policy. Pontiac General Manager Elliot "Pete" Estes approved the new model, although sales manager Frank Bridge, who did not believe it would find a market, insisted on limiting initial production to no more than 5,000 cars.

The Tempest line received another facelift for the 1970 model year. Hidden headlights were deleted in favor of four exposed round headlamps outboard of narrower grille openings. The nose retained the protruding vertical prow theme, although it was less prominent. While the standard Tempest and Le Mans had chrome grilles, the GTO retained the Endura urethane cover around the headlamps and grille.

The suspension was upgraded with the addition of a rear anti-roll bar, essentially the same bar as used on the Oldsmobile 442 and Buick Gran Sport. The front anti-roll bar was slightly stiffer. The result was a useful reduction in body lean in turns and a modest reduction of understeer.

Another handling-related improvement was optional variable-ratio power steering. Rather than a fixed ratio of 17.5:1, requiring four turns lock-to-lock, the new system varied its ratio from 14.6:1 to 18.9:1, needing 3.5 turns lock-to-lock. Turning diameter was reduced from 40.9 feet (12.5 m) to 37.4 feet (11.4 m).

The base engine was unchanged for 1970, but the low-compression economy engine was deleted and the Ram Air III and Ram Air IV remained available, although the latter was now a special-order option.

A new option was Pontiac's 455 HO engine (different from the round-port offerings of the 1971-72 cars), available now that GM had rescinded its earlier ban on intermediates with engines larger than 400. The 455, a long-stroke engine also available in the full-size Pontiac line as well as the Grand Prix, was dubiously rated by Pontiac as only moderately stronger than the base 350 HP 400 cu. in. and less powerful than the 366 hp (273 kW) Ram Air III. Curiously, per the Pontiac brochure of the time, the same spec 455 installed in the Grand Prix model was rated at 370 horsepower (280 kW). The camshafts used in the Ram Air III and the GTO 455 HO were the same. For example the manual transmission 455 HO's used the same 288/302 duration cam as the Ram air III. The 455 was rated at 360 hp (270 kW) at 4,300 rpm. Its advantage was torque: 500 lb·ft (678 N·m) at 2,700 rpm. A functional Ram Air scoop was available. Car and Driver tested a heavily optioned 455, with a four-speed transmission and 3.31 axle and recorded a quarter mile time of 15.0 seconds with a trap speed of 96.5 mph (155.3 km/h) . Car Life's Turbo-Hydramatic 455, with a 3.35 rear differential, clocked 14.76 seconds at 95.94 mph (154.40 km/h), with identical 6.6 second 0-60 mph acceleration. Both were about 3 mph (4.8 km/h) slower than a Ram Air III 400 four-speed, although considerably less temperamental: the Ram Air engine idled roughly and was difficult to drive at low speeds. The smaller displacement engine recorded less than 9 mpg-US (26 L/100 km; 11 mpg-imp) of gasoline, compared to 10 mpg-US (24 L/100 km; 12 mpg-imp)-11 mpg-US (21 L/100 km; 13 mpg-imp) for the 455


Pontiac LeMans Sport 1970

  The Pontiac Le Mans was a model name applied to compact and intermediate-sized automobiles offered by the Pontiac division of General Motors from 1962 to 1981. The Le Mans was replaced by the downsized Pontiac Bonneville for the 1982 model year. In 1987, for the 1988 model year a badge engineered Daewoo LeMans was sold briefly until 1993.






Pontiac LeMans Sport 1970
 F or 1968 the whole Tempest line received a new engine replacing the 326. This new engine was based on all existing Pontiac engine architecture and using the 326, 389, and 400 engines crank at 3.75" and expanding the 326's 3.72" bore to 3.88" to give 350 cubic inches. Pontiac's 350 is not really a 350 though, and if you do the math it comes out to 354.74 or 355. Why Pontiac called it a 350 is a mystery along with the original 326 being called a 326 rather that it's true size of 336. For 1968 the 350 could be had in two versions at 265 hp 2bbl and 325 hp 4bbl. In 1969 the engine came as 265 hp 2bbl and 330 hp 4bbl. The ten horsepower increase over 1968's engine is due to a slightly hotter cam plus the use of the # 48 big valve heads,the same head used on the Ram air 3 400" 366 hp (273 kW) engine and the 428-HO engine at 390 hp. 1969 would be the last high performance version of the 350. It should be noted that the Sprint OHC six had gone from its original size of 230 inches to 250 cubic inches, and the horsepower had increased from the original 207 hp (154 kW) to 230 hp (172 kW) in its final version in 1969.

This engine with a four speed was capable of high fourteen second quarter mile times in a Tempest or Firebird at speeds in the low ninety mile an hour range, definitely much faster than cars with small V-8's of the day. For 1970, Pontiac reshuffled its intermediate lineup a bit with the Le Mans Outlaw edition nameplate downgraded to the mid-line sub-series previously known as the Tempest Custom and included two- and four-door pillared sedans, while the previous top-shelf Le Mans series was renamed the Le Mans Sport in the same three body styles including a four-door hardtop sedan, two-door hardtop coupe and convertible.

Pontiac LeMans  1970
  This year, bigger engines - which had previously reserved for GTOs - were made available on lesser Tempest/Le Mans models including a 400 CID V8 rated at 265 hp (198 kW) with a two-barrel carburetor or a 330 hp (246 kW) option with a four-barrel carburetor and dual exhausts. At mid-year the bottom-shelf Tempest line, which initially included only two- and four-door sedans, got a low-price T-37 hardtop coupe which was initially billed as "General Motors' lowest-priced hardtop (undercut by a base Chevrolet Chevelle hardtop coupe introduced a few weeks later). To offer younger buyers a mid-sized muscle car that was less expensive than the GTO, Pontiac offered the T-37 hardtop coupe with a GT-37 appearance package that included striping, three-speed floor shift transmission, tuned suspension and other tinsel. The GT-37 was available with any Tempest/Le Mans V8 from the standard 350 two-barrel to the 400 four-barrel. Replacing the Pontiac-built OHC six-cylinder as the base engine for Tempest/Le Mans models for 1970 was Chevrolet's 250 cubic-inch inline six-cylinder engine, while the 350 two-barrel was again the base V8 engine and the four-barrel 350 HO was discontinued.
Pontiac LeMans  1970


Pontiac Tempest  1970

 The Pontiac Tempest was an automobile produced by the Pontiac Motor Division of General Motors between 1961 and 1991.

The Tempest was introduced as an entry-level compact in September 1960 for the 1961 model year. Sharing the new monocoque (unibody) Y platform with the Buick Special and Skylark, and Oldsmobile F-85 and Cutlass, the model also appeared under the LeMans nameplate (largely beginning with the 1962 model year, though Pontiac also manufactured a few 1961 Le Mans coupes).




Pontiac Tempest  1970

 For 1964, the platform was redesigned with a full-size frame, and renamed A-body. The Tempest name was discontinued after the 1970 model year in favor of Le Mans, a nameplate previously used for upmarket versions of that series.Pontiac also marketed a rebadged version of the compact L-body Chevrolet Corsica as Tempest, for Canada only, from 1988 to 1991.

A restyled Tempest was introduced for 1968 with more rounded styling cues, concealed windshield wipers, a return to horizontal headlights and a split-wheelbase mode of 112 in (2,800 mm) for two-doors and 116 for four-door models. The OHC sixes were enlarged from 230 to 250 cubic inches with horsepower ratings unchanged while the 326 V8 was replaced by a new 350 in³ V8 with horsepower ratings of 250 with two-barrel or 320 with four-barrel carb. The same lineup of models including the base Tempest, Tempest Custom and Le Mans continued as in previous years.

Other than elimination of vent windows on hardtop coupes, styling only received minor revisions for 1969, when the Tempest Custom was renamed the Custom S for this one year. However model offerings were the same as 1968. A new three-speed Turbo Hydra-matic 350 transmission was introduced and available with all engines as an alternative to the older two-speed automatic. Engine offerings were the same as before except for the 350 HO V8 engine gaining five-horsepower to 325. A new locking steering column with relocated ignition switch was introduced and front seat headrests became standard equipment.

Minor styling revisions highlighted the 1970 Tempest, which would be the final year for the nameplate in the U.S. Initially, the line was down to just two- and four-door sedans but expanded at mid-year with the introduction of the low-priced T-37 hardtop coupe, billed as GM's lowest-priced hardtop coupe.[citation needed] The Custom S became the Le Mans this year and the previous Le Mans series was renamed the Le Mans Sport. The Pontiac-built OHC six-cylinder engine was replaced by a Chevy-built 250 in³ inline six while the 350 V8 was down to a two-barrel 255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) version. New engine offerings included 400 in³ V8s rated at 265 hp (198 kW; 269 PS) with two-barrel carburetor and 8.6:1 compression ratio or 330 with four-barrel and 10.25:1 compression.

The Tempest nameplate was phased out after the 1970 model year. For 1971, it would be replaced by a new T-37 series that included each of the three bodystyles offered on the 1970 Tempest and T-37. After this year, the T-37 would be dropped and for 1972 all Pontiac intermediates took the Le Mans nameplate except the GTO.




Ei kommentteja:

Lähetä kommentti

Huomaa: vain tämän blogin jäsen voi lisätä kommentin.