lauantai 29. kesäkuuta 2013

Suur-Saimaan Ympäriajo 2013 - Veteran Car's touring Lake Saimaa in Finland

Ford A Fordor 1928

Suur-Saimaan Ympäriajo 2013.  Etelä-Karjalan Vanhat Ajoneuvot ry. järjestää yhdessä Mikkelin Mobilistit ry:n kanssa vuosittain Suur-Saimaan Ympäriajo -tapahtuman. tässä kuvia tapahtumasta.  21. Suur-Saimaan ympäriajo 29. - 30.6.2013

Ford A Fordor 1928
The Ford Model A of 1928–1931 (also colloquially called the A-Model Ford or the A, and A-bone among rodders and customizers) was the second huge success for the Ford Motor Company, after its predecessor, the Model T. First produced on October 20, 1927, but not sold until December 2, it replaced the venerable Model T, which had been produced for 18 years. This new Model A (a previous model had used the name in 1903–1904) was designated as a 1928 model and was available in four standard colors.

Austin Healey 100 BN 1 1954
Considered as the original Austin-Healey, the 100 BN1s and BN2s were built from 1953 to 1956. Equipped with a four-cylinder engine, the 100 BN1 series cars featured a production run exceeding 10,000 units, while only about 4,500 of the later BN2 series cars were produced. Most enthusiasts do not differentiate the two series substantially, as the only noticeable variation on the BN2 was the adoption of a four-speed/overdrive gearbox in lieu of the three-speed/overdrive on the earlier cars.

Armstrong Siddeley Sapphire 346 1953
The 346 was the first of the Sapphires introduced late in 1952 for sale in 1953 and continuing until 1958. The six-cylinder 3,435 cc engine had hemi-spherical combustion chambers and could have optional twin Stromberg carburettors (£25 extra) which increased the output from 125 to 150 bhp (93 to 112 kW) giving a top speed in excess of 100 mph (161 km/h). The front suspension was independent coil springs with a rigid axle and leaf springs at the rear. The Girling hydraulic brakes used 11 in (279 mm) drums all round.

Cadillac 62 Series Convertible 1956
In 1956 there was a new grille, with finer textured insert, and the repositioning of the parking lights in the bumpers, below the wing guards. Buyers were given an option of the standard satin finish grille or an optional gold finish. Cadillac script was found on the left side. A narrow chrome molding and nine vertical louvores were seen. The Coupe de Ville had a model nameplate and a Cadillac crest on the sides of the front fenders. The Coupe de Ville was joined by the Series 62 Sedan de Ville,

Cadillac 62 Series Convertible 1956
Cadillac's first standard production 4-door hardtop. Similarly to the Coupe de Ville, it was also more expensive and more luxuriously trimmed that the standard 4-door Series 62. With 41,732 sold, it also easily outsold the Series 62 sedan in its very first year. Given their sales success, it was only natural that the Coupe de Ville and Sedan de Ville were moved to their own separate series in 1959, the Series 6300, being joined by a De Ville convertible in 1964. The Eldorado subseries also gained a new bodystyle, a 2-door hardtop called the Seville. An Eldorado script finally appeared with fender crest on the car which was further distinguished by a twin hood ornament. Extras featured on the Eldorado convertible, now known as the Biarritz in order to distinguish it from the Seville, were a ribbed chrome saddle molding extending from the windshield to the rear window pillar along the beltline and flat, pointed rear fender fins. Power steering was now standard.[9] The turning circle was 43.5 ft. wide and ground clearance is 8.25 inches.

Series 62 sales reached an all-time record in 1956 at 134,502 units, accounting for an all-time record 86.4% of all Cadillacs sold. This included 66,818 De Villes and 6050 Eldorados.

Armstrong Siddeley Sapphire 346 1953
The body was available as a four- or six-light (two or three windows on each side) at the same cost and with either a bench or individual front seats. The seats were finished in leather, with the dashboard and door-cappings in walnut veneer. A heater was standard.

It was introduced with the choice of a Wilson electrically-controlled finger-tip four-speed pre-selector gearbox as a £30 option, or four-speed synchromesh gearbox. It became available with automatic transmission (Rolls Royce four-speed) with the introduction of the Mark II in 1954.

A long-wheelbase model was launched in 1955 as a limousine version which had the pre-selector gearbox as standard, however, there was an optional four-speed manual column-change gearbox available.

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL 1959
The Mercedes-Benz 300SL was the first iteration of the SL-Class grand tourer convertibles and fastest production car of its day. Internally numbered W198, it was introduced in 1954 as a two-seat sports car with distinctive gull-wing doors and later offered as an open roadster.

Built by Daimler-Benz AG, the fuel-injected production model was based on the company's highly successful yet somewhat less powerful carbureted 1952 race car, the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (W194).

The idea of a toned-down W194 tailored to affluent performance enthusiasts in the booming post-war American market was suggested by Max Hoffman. As such, it was introduced at the 1954 New York Auto Show rather than the Frankfurt or Geneva shows at which other Mercedes models made their debuts. The "300" in its name referred to its three litre engine displacement, and "SL" stood for "Sport Leicht" (Sport Light).

The 300SL was best known for its distinctive gull wing doors, first-ever consumer fuel-injection, and world's fastest top speed. The gull wing version was available from March 1955 to 1957, the roadster from 1957 to 1963. It was followed in the Mercedes line by the 230SL

Jaguar XK 150 1960
The Jaguar XK150 is a sports car produced by Jaguar between 1957 and 1961. It replaced the XK140.

Initially it was available in Fixed Head Coupé (FHC) and Drophead Coupé (DHC) versions. The Roadster (XK150 OTS - Open Two-Seat) was launched in 1958. Minimal rear seats were fitted in the coupés.


Jaguar XK 150 1960
Although bearing a family resemblance to the XK120 and XK140, the XK150 was radically revised. A one-piece windscreen replaced the split screen, and the wing line no longer dropped so deeply at the doors. The widened bonnet opened down to the wings, and on the Roadster the bulkhead was moved back 4 inches (102 mm) to make the bonnet longer. The car was available at various times in Red, Pearl Grey, White, Indigo Blue, Claret, Cotswold Blue, Black, Mist Grey, Sherwood Green, Carmen Red, British Racing Green, Cornish Grey, and Imperial Maroon.

Jaguar XK 150 1960
While the first XK150s were slower than their predecessors, the deficit was corrected in the spring of 1958 with a 3.4-litre "S" engine whose three 2-inch (51 mm) SU HD8 carburettors and straight-port cylinder head increased power to a claimed 250 SAE bhp.

For 1960, the 3.4 litre engine was bored to 3.8 litres, rating this option at 220 hp (164 kW; 223 PS) in standard tune or 265 hp (198 kW; 269 PS) in "S" form. A 3.8 litre 150S could top 135 mph (217 km/h) and go from 0–60 mph in around 7.0 seconds. Fuel economy was 18mpg. Four-wheel Dunlop 12 in (305 mm) disc brakes appeared for the first time although it was theoretically possible to order a car with drums. Either wire wheels or disc wheels could be specified.

Volvo P 1800 S 1964
The classic image of Roger Moore driving his Volvo sports car in the 1960's TV show, The Saint, endures even today. The Volvo Car Corporation supplied the "The Saint" television producers a total of five P1800 models for use on their show. Volvo happily supplied the first one in 1962, registered as 71 DXC, within a week of its being requested.

In 1964, Volvo moved production of the P1800 line from England to Sweden, and sent one of the new 1800S models, registration 77 GYL, to the set of "The Saint". The first car was then chopped up for better interior shot access.

EMW 340-2 Limousine 1953
The BMW 340, subsequently rebadged as the EMW 340, was a large six-cylinder four-door passenger saloon produced at Eisenach initially in the name of BMW. Five-door 340 station wagons were also manufactured. It was described in 1948 as the first new car model produced in Germany after the war: despite new body panels, under the skin it was a modified version of the BMW 326 with which it shared its engine and wheelbase, and which had originally been commercialised in 1936. The 326 had nevertheless been an innovative and well regarded product and the 340, which incorporated several improvements, was seen as a desirable car well into the 1950s. Early years were dogged by disputes centred on ownership of the plant where it was assembled and its manufacturers’ rights to use the BMW name. The cars later appeared badged as EMW 340s, and it was under this name that 340s continued to be sold until at least 1953.

Triumph TR4 1963
The Triumph TR4 is a sports car built in the United Kingdom by the Standard Triumph Motor Company and introduced in 1961. Code named "Zest" during development, the car was based on the chassis and drivetrain of the previous TR sports cars, but with a modern Michelotti styled body. 40,253 cars were built during production years. The TR4 proved very successful and continued the rugged, "hairy-chested" image that the previous TRs had enjoyed.

Fiat 600 Multipla 1956  Itävalta
The original Fiat 600 Multipla were based on the Fiat 600's drivetrain, model 1100 coil and wishbone independent front suspension, and sat 6 people in a footprint just 50 centimetres (19.7 in) longer than the original Mini Cooper. The driver compartment was moved forward over the front axle, eliminating the boot in effect but giving the body a very minivan-like "one-box" look. Behind the front seat the vehicle could be arranged with a flat floor area or a choice of one or two bench seats.

Until the 1970s it was widely used as a taxi in many parts of Italy.

A 633 cc right hand drive Multipla was tested by the British magazine The Motor in 1956 and was found to have a top speed of 57.1 mph (91.9 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-50 mph (80 km/h) in 43.0 seconds. A fuel consumption of 38.4 miles per imperial gallon (7.36 L/100 km; 32.0 mpg-US) was recorded. The test car cost £799 including taxes on the UK market.

Studebaker Gt Hawk 1963
The Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk (or GT Hawk), a sporty coupe sold between 1962 and 1964, was the final development of the Studebaker Hawk series that began with the Golden Hawk of 1956.

For 1963 the car was slightly restyled, with refinements to the front, sides, and rear. Round parking lights below the headlights replaced the previous rectangular ones, set into the corners of the newly-closed side grilles that bore a squared pattern of lines over fine mesh. This same squared mesh pattern was carried over onto the main grille, replacing the simple fine mesh of the 1962 models. Early in 1963 production the parking light bezels were changed and the right side of the dash became woodgrain, matching the area around the instruments. The doors had red, white, and blue emblems added next to the Gran Turismo emblems, and at the rear, the aluminum overlay's colors were reversed and red, white, and blue were added to the Hawk emblem on the top of the trunk lid. Inside, 1963 Hawks have vertical pleats in the seat upholstery, replacing the 1962's horizontal pleats, and have far superior vinyl.

Alfa Romeo Giulietta Spider 1960
The Alfa Romeo Giulietta (series 750 and 101) was a compact automobile manufactured by the Italian car maker Alfa Romeo from 1954 to 1965. The Giulietta was introduced at the Turin Motor Show in 1954 and almost 132,000 were built in the Portello factory in Milan.

The first Giulietta model was a coupé, the Giulietta Sprint, introduced in late 1954. This was followed by a sedan in spring 1955 and in mid 1955, the open two-seat Giulietta Spider, featuring convertible bodywork by Pininfarina. In 1957 more powerful Berlina version, called Giulietta TI (Turismo Internazionale) was presented with minor cosmetic changes to the hood, the dial lights and rear lamps.

A new version of the Giulietta debuted at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1959. The fuel tank was now incorporated in the right rear fender and was equipped with a door. The nose was redefined with more rounded wings, recessed lights, new headlights and grille rings revised with horizontal bars. The interior was much more organized and the dashboard instruments had an elongated bore including the tachometer. The series number was changed from 750/753 to the 101 series.
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Vuonna 1956 markkinoille ilmestyi Giulietta Spider, joka oli samalla tekniikalla kuin mallisarjan aloittanut Sprint. Sprint Velocessa (1956) oli alumiinista valmistetu ovet, konepelti ja takaluukku. Taka- ja sivulasit olivat muovia. Veloce-mallia varten alkuperäinen moottori oli viritetty 90 hv:n tehoiseksi. 1957 esiteltiin Giulietta TI ja siinä oli 65 hv Sprint-mallin moottori. Tästä mallista tuli koko sarjan suosituin auto.

Autosta tehtiin myös erikoismalleja kuten Bertonen Sprint Speciale (SS) ja Sprint Zagato (SZ), joissa oli alkuperäiseen malliin verrattuna kokonaan uusi kori. Autoissa oli sama 1,3-litrainen (1 290 cm³) moottori, josta otettiin irti 100 hv. Vaihteisto oli 5-portainen.


De Tomaso Longchamp 1975
The Longchamp was developed from the De Tomaso Deauville four-door sedan, using a shorter wheelbase chassis with the same suspension, engine and transmission. The two models were the only front-engined production cars produced by De Tomaso. The Longchamp was first exhibited at the 1972 Turin Motor Show  and was initially offered only as a two-door 2+2 coupé. It was designed by Tom Tjaarda of Ghia and was influenced by his previous Lancia Marica prototype. The taillights were the same units as were used for the Alfa Romeo 1750/2000 saloon.

The Longchamp featured a long hood to accommodate a 351 cuin (5,769 cc) Ford Cleveland V8. The 351 Cleveland, a popular engine in late 1960s Ford "muscle cars," was the same as that used in the Pantera. It produced 330 hp (246 kW) and gave the Longchamp a 240 km/h (149 mph) top speed. The engine power was later reduced to 270 hp (200 kW). The standard gearbox was a three-speed Ford C-6 Cruise-o-Matic automatic gearbox, however around 17 cars were equipped with a five-speed ZF manual gearbox. The suspension was independent front and rear with coil spring and wishbone suspension. Steering was power assisted rack and pinion with vented disc brakes all around, the rear discs being positioned inboard. The interior of the car was quite luxurious and it was almost fully covered with leather, although the use of Ford's partsbin (steering wheel, gear shift) took away somewhat of the luxurious impression.


MG Magnette ZB 4 D Saloon 1956
The ZA was replaced by the Magnette ZB in 1956. Power was increased to 64 hp (48 kW) by fitting 1½ inch carburettors, increasing the compression ratio from 7.5 to 8.3, and modifying the manifold.. The extra power increased the top speed to 86 mph (138 km/h) and reduced the 0-60 mph time to 18.5 seconds. The similar Wolseley 15/50 now shared the ZB's B-Series engine.

Manumatic semi-automatic transmission was an option from January 1957 but only 496 Magnettes were fitted with it and it was withdrawn in 1958

The interior was improved and there was also a Varitone model with a larger rear window and optional two tone paintwork. This used a standard Pressed Steel body shell, the rear window opening being enlarged in the Morris Motors body shop, Cowley, before painting

Messerschmitt KR 200 1955
The Messerschmitt KR200, or Kabinenroller (Cabin Scooter), was a three-wheeled bubble car designed by the aircraft engineer Fritz Fend and produced in the factory of the German aircraft manufacturer Messerschmitt from 1955 to 1964.

The KR200 replaced the KR175 in 1955. While using the same basic frame as the KR175 with changes to the bodywork (notably including wheel cutouts in the front fenders) and an improved canopy design, the KR200 was otherwise an almost total redesign. The rear suspension and engine mounting were reworked, and hydraulic shock absorbers were installed at all three wheels. Tire sizes were enlarged to 4.00×8.

Retailing for around DM 2,500, the KR200 was considered an instant success with almost 12,000 built during its first year. A maximum speed in excess of 90 km/h (56 mph) despite a claimed power output of only 10 PS (7.4 kW; 9.9 hp) reflected the vehicle's light weight.

In 1956, Messerschmitt was allowed to manufacture aircraft again and lost interest in Fend's microcars. Messerschmitt sold the Regenburg works to Fend who, with brake and hub supplier Valentin Knott, formed Fahrzeug- und Maschinenbau GmbH Regensburg (FMR) to continue production of the KR200 and his other vehicles.

Mercedes-Benz 220 1952
The Mercedes-Benz W187 is an automobile which was produced by Mercedes-Benz from 1951 to 1955. Introduced at the Frankfurt Motor Show in April 1951 as a six-cylinder luxury car, it was sold in sedan, coupe, and cabriolet body styles, all with the 220 model name. Over six decades several very different models have been branded as a "Mercedes-Benz 220" which is why the 1951 car is now usually identified using its internal works number as the Mercedes-Benz W187.

Despite their tradition as a manufacturer of luxury cars, after the end of the war Mercedes-Benz produced only four cylinder engined passenger cars until 1951. The Mercedes-Benz 220 and the more powerful Mercedes-Benz 300, introduced at the same time, were the first post-war Mercedes-Benz models to feature six cylinder engines.

Plymouth Deluxe Sedan 1939
In 1939 Plymouth produced 417,528 vehicles, of which 5,967 were two-door convertible coupes with rumble seats. The 1939 convertible coupe was prominently featured at Chrysler's exhibit at the 1939 New York World's Fair, advertised as the first mass-production convertible with a power folding top. It featured a 201 cu in, 82 hp version of the flathead six engine.

Jowett Javelin 1952
The Jowett Javelin is British car that was produced from 1947 to 1953 by Jowett Cars Ltd of Idle, near Bradford. The model went through five variants labelled PA to PE, each having a standard and "de luxe" option. The car was designed by Gerald Palmer during World War II and was intended to be a major leap forward following the relatively staid designs of pre-war Jowetts. Just over 23,000 units were produced.

The flat four overhead valve engine of 1486 cc with a compression ratio of 7.2:1 was water-cooled and had an aluminium block and wet cylinder liners. It developed 50 bhp (37 kW) at 4100 rpm (52.5 bhp in the case of the PE) giving the car a maximum speed of 77 mph (124 km/h) and a 0-50 mph (80 km/h) time of 13.4 seconds. Two Zenith carburettors were fitted and PA and PB versions had hydraulic tappets. The radiator was behind the engine. A four-speed gearbox with column change was used. Early cars had gearboxes made by the Henry Meadows company, whilst the remainder of the cars had gearboxes made by Jowett themselves. The decision to make the gearboxes in house proved to be a costly mistake for Jowett

Mercedes-Benz 170 VA 1951
The Mercedes-Benz W136 was Mercedes-Benz's line of four-cylinder automobiles from the mid-1930s into the 1950s. The car was first presented in public in February 1936, although by that time production had already been under way for a couple of months. Between 1936 and 1939, and again between 1947 and 1953 it was the manufacturer's top selling automobile.

After the Second World War the W136 became the foundation on which the company rebuilt, because enough of the tooling had survived allied bombing or could be recreated.

1949 saw the arrival of the Mercedes-Benz 170S version of the W136. This model is in retrospect sometimes celebrated as the first S-Class Mercedes-Benz. It was a more luxurious, costlier and, when launched, slightly larger version of the mainstream model and the manufacturer made an effort to maximize the differentiation between the two. The Mercedes-Benz 170 Sb and 170 DS were even given a different works number in 1952, being internally designated between 1952 and 1953 as the Mercedes-Benz W191.

1955 was the car's last year of production. Its replacement, the W120 had already been on sale since July 1953, after which the older model was repositioned in the market as a lower priced alternative to the new one.

Chrysler Widsor 1949
The Chrysler Windsor was a full-sized car built by the Chrysler Corporation of Highland Park, Michigan (USA) from 1939 through to the 1960s. The final Chrysler Windsor as known to Americans was produced in 1961, but continued production in Canada until 1966. The Canadian 1961 to 1966 Windsor model was for all intents and purposes the equivalent of the Chrysler Newport in the United States.

The Windsor was positioned above the entry-level Royal from 1939 to 1950. With the demise of the Royal for the 1951 model year the Windsor became Chrysler's price leader through to 1960. For the 1961 model year the Chrysler Newport was made the marque's price leader with the Windsor positioned one level above the Newport. Chrysler replaced the Windsor name in 1962 with the introduction of the non-lettered series Chrysler 300.

Dodge Coronet Club Coupe 1949
The Coronet was a full-size car from Dodge in the 1950s, initially the division's highest trim line but, starting in 1955, the lowest trim line. In the 1960s, the name was transferred to Dodge's mid-size entry.

The Dodge Coronet 1949 was introduced with the division's first postwar body styles. Lower trim lines were the Wayfarer and Meadowbrook. The only engine for Dodge was a 230-cubic-inch (3,800 cc) flat-head straight six cylinder engine with a single barrel Stromberg carburetor, producing 103 horsepower (77 kW) (gross). The stock Dodge Coronet was a smooth running car, and the six-cylinder engine could power the car to 90 miles per hour (140 km/h)+ . A limited production model was a four-door, eight passenger limousine, an extended version of the stock Dodge Coronet. One of the most notable features of the first-generation Coronet was a three-speed, fluid-driven transmission that was operated by a foot pedal on the floor. It required no shifter. It had full instramentation.

Citroën BL 11 Berline 1955
Making it a habit to be at the forefront of the newest technological inventions, Automobiles Citroën has always tried to be the leader in this arena. Citroën needed a totally new revolutionary model in 1933, despite all of its financial problems. The desired features in the new model included 100 km/h maximum speed, uni-body construction, a consumption of 10 liters/100 km, automatic gearbox and front-wheel drive.

Designed by André Lefèbvre and Flaminio Bertoni, the Citroën Traction Avant was introduced at the end of 1933 by the French manufacturer Citroën. The Avant was the product of the French mass-production pioneer of front drive and all-steel unit construction, encouraged by America's Budd Body Company. During its production run from 1934 through 1957 a total of 760,000 units were produced. One of the most successful vehicles with front wheel drive in the 1930's, the Traction Avant was not the first production front wheel drive car. 'Traction Avant' is French for front wheel drive.

Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III 1965
The Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud was the core model of the Rolls-Royce Motor Cars range from April 1955 until March 1966. It replaced the Silver Dawn and was, in turn, replaced by the Silver Shadow. The J. P. Blatchley design was a major change from the pre-war models and the highly derivative Silver Dawn. As part of a range rationalisation the Bentley S1 is very similar, apart from its radiator grille.

The Silver Cloud III arrived in 1963. External dimensions were slightly tweaked, the interior remodelled, the weight reduced by a little over 100 kg (220 lb) and improvements made to the engine which included fitting 2-inch (51 mm) SU carburettors in place of the 1¾ inch units used on the Series II Silver Cloud. The compression ratio was increased to 9:1, reflecting the higher octane levels of premium fuel in major markets, although the option of a lower 8:1 compression ratio was still offered in markets where non-availability of higher octane fuels might be an issue. Rolls-Royce, as before, refused to disclose overall engine power output, but indicated that there had been an improvement of "perhaps 7%". Increased power and weight reduction boosted speed and performance slightly. The engine now included a nitride hardened crankshaft to reflect the extra power being generated and in response to reports of broken crankshafts in the earlier V8 Silver Clouds. The transmission was a GM Hydramatic which Rolls-Royce used under licence.

Rolls-Royce Comiche Cabrio 1973


Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III 1965



Austin Healey 100 BN 1 1954



Austin Healey 100 BN 1 1954










Ford Mustang Confortible Luxury 1967




Ford Mustang Confortible Luxury 1967



Borgward Isabella Coupe 1960



Mercedes-Benz 300 SL 1959



Mercedes-Benz 300 SL 1959



Lincoln Continental Mk IV HT 1974



Studebaker Lark IV 4 D 1960



MG B Roadster 1972



Ford Thunderbird 1964



Cadillac 62 Series Convertible 1956






Mercedes-Benz L312 1957



Diamond T 306 H 1949



Studebaker Transtar Pick Up 1958



Mercedes-Benz 220 1952



Mercedes-Benz 220 Sb Typ W111 1963



Ford Customline 4 D Sedan 1952



Ford Customline 4 D Sedan 1952





MG TD Mk II 1951



Ford A Fordor 1928






De Tomaso Longchamp 1975



De Tomaso Longchamp 1975















































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